Abdominal Adhesions

Reviewed 06/2018
 


BASICS

  • Pathologic bands of scar tissue that form between two previously separated structures within the abdomen

  • Adhesions most commonly between:

    • Omentum

    • Bowel loops

    • Abdominal wall

DESCRIPTION

  • Adhesions may ...

DIAGNOSIS

Adhesions are primarily diagnosed through patient history and/or intraoperatively. The number of adhesions does not correlate with symptoms. 
ALERT

SBO in patients without a history of abdomin...

TREATMENT

SURGERY/OTHER PROCEDURES

  • Nasogastric decompression for patients with suspected partial SBO without specific indications for surgery (5)[A]

  • Adhesiolysis

    • Performed for symptomatic complications o...

ONGOING CARE

PROGNOSIS

  • Adhesions are typically asymptomatic. Once present, they cannot be fully removed.

  • No single approach has been satisfactory in removing adhesions.

COMPLICATIONS

  • Most common complicat...

REFERENCES

Arung W, Meurisse M, Detry O. Pathophysiology and prevention of postoperative peritoneal adhesions. World J Gastroenterol.  2011;17(41):4545–4553.  [View Abstract]
Moris D, Chakedis J...

ADDITIONAL READING

  • Diamond MP, Burns EL, Accomando B, et al. Seprafilm(®) adhesion barrier: (2) a review of the clinical literature on intraabdominal use. Gynecol Surg.  2012;9(3):247–257.

  • Hellebr...

SEE ALSO

Algorithms: Infertility; Intestinal Obstruction 

CODES

ICD10

  • K66.0 Peritoneal adhesions (postprocedural) (postinfection)

  • Q43.3 Congenital malformations of intestinal fixation

  • N99.4 Postprocedural pelvic peritoneal adhesions

  • N73.6 Female pelvic peritonea...

CLINICAL PEARLS

  • Abdominal adhesions result primarily from abdominal infection or trauma (including surgery).

  • Most adhesions are asymptomatic; the most common complication is bowel obstruction (partial ...

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