Angiodysplasia

Reviewed 06/2017
 


BASICS

  • Dysplastic blood vessel formation within the gastrointestinal tract

  • Also known as angioectasias, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and telangiectasias

DESCRIPTION

  • Most common vascular abnormality...

DIAGNOSIS

  • Often found incidentally during endoscopy

  • May be found during evaluation for GI bleeding

HISTORY

  • Usually asymptomatic

  • May have overt rectal bleeding or melena

  • May have symptoms of anemia if bleed...

TREATMENT

Angiodysplasias incidentally found during gastrointestinal evaluation; for another reason, have minimal bleeding risk and should not be treated. 

MEDICATION

Several medications have been studi...

ONGOING CARE

FOLLOWUP RECOMMENDATIONS

  • Patients may require multiple transfusions.

  • Consider iron supplementation.

MONITORING

Monitor for anemia: Check CBC intermittently for hemoglobin, hematocrit, and MCV...

REFERENCES

Foutch PG, Rex DK, Lieberman DA. Prevalence and natural history of colonic angiodysplasia among healthy asymptomatic people. Am J Gastroenterol.  1995;90(4):564–567. [View Abstract on...

ADDITIONAL READING

  • Bauditz J, Lochs H. Angiogenesis and vascular malformations: antiangiogenic drugs for treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding. World J Gastroenterol.  2007;13(45):5979–5984. [Vi...

CODES

ICD10

  • K55.20 Angiodysplasia of colon without hemorrhage

  • K55.21 Angiodysplasia of colon with hemorrhage

  • K31.819 Angiodysplasia of stomach and duodenum without bleeding

  • K31.811 Angiodysplasia of stoma...

PEARLS

  • Angiodysplasias are small vascular lesions along the GI tract. Most found in the cecum and proximal ascending colon. May be the source of blood loss in cases of obscure GI bleeding

  • Angiodysplasi...

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