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Angiodysplasia

Gregory M. Piech, MD, MPH and Marie L. Borum, MD, EdD, MPH Reviewed 06/2018
 


BASICS

  • Dysplastic blood vessel formation within the mucosal and submucosal layers of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract

  • Also known as angioectasias, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), and telangiectasias

DESCRIPTION

DIAGNOSIS

Most commonly discovered as an incidental finding during endoscopy 

HISTORY

  • Usually asymptomatic

  • May have overt rectal bleeding or melena

  • May have symptoms of anemia if bleeding is recurrent or ...

TREATMENT

  • Angiodysplasias incidentally found during GI evaluation for alternative reasons have minimal bleeding risk and should not be treated. Treat with supplemental iron if indicated.

  • Acutely bleedi...

ONGOING CARE

FOLLOW-UP RECOMMENDATIONS

  • Patients may require multiple transfusions.

  • Consider iron supplementation.

Patient Monitoring

Monitor for anemia: Check CBC intermittently for hemoglobin, hematocrit...

REFERENCES

1
Gurudu SR, Bruining DH, Acosta RD, et al; for ASGE Standards of Practice Committee. The role of endoscopy in the management of suspected small-bowel bleeding. Gastrointest Endosc.  20...

ADDITIONAL READING

  • Bauditz J, Lochs H. Angiogenesis and vascular malformations: antiangiogenic drugs for treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding. World J Gastroenterol.  2007;13(45):5979–5984.

  • Digg...

CODES

ICD10

  • K55.20 Angiodysplasia of colon without hemorrhage

  • K55.21 Angiodysplasia of colon with hemorrhage

  • K31.819 Angiodysplasia of stomach and duodenum without bleeding

  • K31.811 Angiodysplasia of stoma...

CLINICAL PEARLS

  • Angiodysplasias are small vascular lesions along the GI tract. Mostly found in the cecum, proximal ascending colon and small bowel; may be the source of blood loss in cases of obscure ...

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