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Candidiasis, Invasive

Anne Worth, DO and Stephen E. Auciello, MD Reviewed 06/2018
 


BASICS

DESCRIPTION

Candida albicans and related species cause a variety of infections. Noninvasive candidal infections are common and can take many forms including esophagitis, vaginitis, onychomycosis...

DIAGNOSIS

HISTORY

  • Fever unresponsive to broad-spectrum antibiotics in patients at high risk for invasive candidiasis

  • Prolonged central venous catheterization

  • Symptoms are often nonspecific, need to have ...

TREATMENT

Inpatient care is recommended for hematogenously disseminated invasive candidiasis. 

GENERAL MEASURES

  • Remove all intravenous catheters if possible. Removing central venous catheter decreases m...

ONGOING CARE

FOLLOW-UP RECOMMENDATIONS

Patients should have follow-up visit 6 weeks after end of therapy to evaluate for complications of metastatic infection. 

Patient Monitoring

  • Evaluate CBC, serum ele...

REFERENCES

1
Kale-Pradhan PB, Morgan G, Wilhelm SM, et al. Comparative efficacy of echinocandins and nonechinocandins for the treatment of Candida parapsilosis infections: a meta-analysis. Pharmacother...

ADDITIONAL READING

  • Chalmers C, Gaur S, Chew J, et al. Epidemiology and management of candidaemia—a retrospective, multicentre study in five hospitals in the UK. Mycoses.  2011;54(6):e795–e800.

  • Dou...

CODES

ICD10

  • B37.7 Candidal sepsis

  • P37.5 Neonatal candidiasis

  • B37.89 Other sites of candidiasis

  • B37.0 Candidal stomatitis

  • B37.49 Other urogenital candidiasis

  • B37.2 Candidiasis of skin and nail

  • B37.9 Candidias...

CLINICAL PEARLS

  • Consider invasive candidemia in high-risk febrile patients not responding to appropriate antibiotic treatment.

  • Start antifungal therapy on all candidemic patients within 24 hours of a p...

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