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Cutaneous Drug Reactions

Chris Place, MD Reviewed 06/2018
 


BASICS

DESCRIPTION

  • An adverse cutaneous reaction in response to administration of a drug. Rashes are the most common adverse drug reactions.

  • Severity can range from mild eruptions that resolve within 48...

DIAGNOSIS

HISTORY

  • New medications within the preceding 6 weeks, most commonly within preceding 2 weeks: all oral, parenteral, and topical agents, including over-the-counter drugs, vitamins, and herbal ...

TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

  • Monitor for signs of impending cardiovascular collapse: Anaphylactic reactions, DRESS, SJS/TEN, extensive bullous reactions, and generalized erythroderma may require inpatien...

ONGOING CARE

FOLLOW UP RECOMMENDATIONS

Patient Monitoring

  • For urticarial, bullous, DRESS, or erythema multiforme spectrum lesions, close follow-up is needed.

  • Patients with anaphylaxis/angioedema should b...

REFERENCES

1
1 Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters, American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, et al. Drug allergy: an updated practice ...

CODES

ICD10

  • L27.1 Loc skin eruption due to drugs and meds taken internally

  • L50.0 Allergic urticaria

  • R21 Rash and other nonspecific skin eruption

  • L27.0 Gen skin eruption due to drugs and meds taken interna...

CLINICAL PEARLS

  • Virtually, any drug can cause a rash; antibiotics are the most common culprits that cause cutaneous drug reactions.

  • Focus on drug history with new suspicious skin eruptions.

  • Usually self...

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