Skip to main content

Encopresis

Jay Fong, MD and William T. Garrison, PhD Reviewed 06/2018
 


BASICS

DESCRIPTION

  • Voluntary or involuntary fecal soilage in a (typically) previously toilet-trained child

    • Age may be chronologic or developmental.

    • No underlying organic disease

    • At least one event per m...

DIAGNOSIS

HISTORY

  • Signs/symptoms of constipation:

    • Hard, large-caliber stools

    • <3 defecations per week

    • Pain or discomfort with stool passage

    • Withholding stool

    • Blood on stool or in diaper/toilet bowl

    • Decre...

TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

  • Anticipatory toilet training advice about when children should reduce reliance on diapers or use pull-ups during the daytime hours (average age for toilet training in girls i...

ONGOING CARE

FOLLOW UP RECOMMENDATIONS

Patient Monitoring

  • Continue maintenance treatment for 6 months to 2 years with visits every 4 to 10 weeks for support and to ensure compliance; more frequent visit...

REFERENCES

1
1 Brazzelli M, Griffiths PV, Cody JD, et al. Behavioural and cognitive interventions with or without other treatments for the management of faecal incontinence in children. Cochrane Databa...

ADDITIONAL READING

  • Constipation Guideline Committee of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. Evaluation and treatment of constipation in infants and chil...

CODES

ICD10

  • R15.9 Full incontinence of feces

  • R15.1 Fecal smearing

  • F98.1 Encopresis not due to a substance or known physiol condition

  • R15.0 Incomplete defecation

  • R15.2 Fecal urgency

ICD9

  • 787.60 Full incontine...

CLINICAL PEARLS

  • 90% of encopresis results from chronic constipation.

  • Address toddler constipation early by decreasing excessive milk intake, increasing fruits/vegetables intake, and ensuring adequate f...

Subscribe to Access Full Content

Sign Up for a 10-Day Free Trial

Sign up for a 10-day FREE Trial now and receive full access to all content.

×