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Folliculitis

David L. Anderson, MD Reviewed 06/2018
 


BASICS

DESCRIPTION

  • Superficial inflammation of a follicle, usually a hair follicle, caused by infection, local trauma, or chemical irritation (1)

  • Can occur anywhere on the body where hair is found

  • Most f...

DIAGNOSIS

HISTORY

  • Recent use of hot tubs, swimming pools, topical corticosteroids, certain hair styling and shaving practices, antibiotics or systemic steroids

  • HIV status

  • History of STDs (specifically sy...

TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

  • Lesions usually resolve spontaneously.

  • Avoid shaving and waxing affected areas (5)[C].

  • Warm compresses may be applied TID.

  • Systemic antibiotics are typically unnecessary.

  • Topical...

ONGOING CARE

FOLLOW UP RECOMMENDATIONS

Patient Monitoring

  • Resistant cases should be followed every 2 weeks until cleared.

  • One return visit in 2 weeks if symptoms abate

DIET

For obese patients, weight reduc...

REFERENCES

1
1 Breitkopf T, Leung G, Yu M, et al. The basic science of hair biology: what are the causal mechanisms for the disordered hair follicle? Dermatol Clin.  2013;31(1):1–19.
2
2 Song HS, Ki...

ADDITIONAL READING

  • Bachet JB, Peuvrel L, Bachmeyer C, et al. Folliculitis induced by EGFR inhibitors, preventive and curative efficacy of tetracyclines in the management and incidence rates according ...

SEE ALSO

Algorithm: Rash 

CODES

ICD10

  • L73.9 Follicular disorder, unspecified

  • L66.2 Folliculitis decalvans

  • L73.8 Other specified follicular disorders

  • L01.02 Bockhart’s impetigo

ICD9

  • 704.8 Other specified diseases of hair and hair fol...

CLINICAL PEARLS

  • Folliculitis lesions are typically 1- to 5-mm clusters of pruritic erythematous papules and pustules.

  • Most commonly due to S. aureus. If community has increased incidence of MRSA, consi...

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