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Angioedema

Kathryn M. Brown, MD, Haley Stewart, DO and Katherine Montag Schafer, PharmD, BCACP Reviewed 06/2019
 


BASICS

DESCRIPTION

  • Angioedema (AE) is acute, localized swelling of skin, mucosa, and submucosa caused by extravasation of fluid into the affected tissues.

  • AE develops in minutes to hours and resolves in...

DIAGNOSIS

HISTORY

  • Acute, typically asymmetric, swelling with onset in minutes to hours (2)

  • In comparison with urticaria, AE typically is nonpruritic, but it can cause a painful, burning sensation (2).

  • Re...

TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

  • Intubation if airway is threatened (3)[C]

  • Eliminate suspected trigger (2)[C].

  • Volume replacement is essential for patients who are unstable or refractory to initial therapy (3)...

ONGOING CARE

FOLLOW-UP RECOMMENDATIONS

Patient Monitoring

  • Diagnostic workup if symptoms are severe, persistent, or recurrent

  • For those with recurrent AE, specialty management is recommended.

DIET

Avoid ide...

REFERENCES

1
LoVerde D, Files DC, Krishnaswamy G. Angioedema. Crit Care Med.  2017;45(4):725–735. [View Abstract on OvidMedline]
2
Temiño VM, Peebles RSJr. The spectrum and treatment of angioedema. ...

SEE ALSO

Anaphylaxis; Urticaria 

CODES

ICD10

  • T78.3XXA Angioneurotic edema, initial encounter

  • D84.1 Defects in the complement system

ICD9

  • 995.1 Angioneurotic edema, not elsewhere classified

  • 277.6 Other deficiencies of circulating enzymes

SNOMED

CLINICAL PEARLS

  • AE is an acute, localized swelling of skin, mucosa, and submucosa caused by extravasation of fluid into the affected tissues.

  • Onset is in minutes to hours and often resolves in hours to...

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