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Burns

Caleb J. Mentzer, DO, Cragin Currence, MD and James R. Yon, MD Reviewed 06/2021
 


BASICS

DESCRIPTION

  • Tissue injuries caused by application of heat, chemicals, electricity, or irradiation

  • Extent of injury (depth of burn) is a result of intensity and duration of exposure.

    • 1st degree inv...

DIAGNOSIS

HISTORY

  • History of source of burn

  • In children or elderly: Check for consistency between the history and the burn’s physical characteristics.

PHYSICAL EXAM

  • 1st degree: erythema of involved tissue...

TREATMENT

  • Prehospital care

    • Remove the patient from the source of burn.

    • Extinguish and remove all burning clothing.

    • Room-temperature water may be poured onto burn but only in the first 15 minutes followin...

ONGOING CARE

FOLLOW-UP RECOMMENDATIONS

Early mobilization is the goal. 

DIET

  • High-protein, high-calorie diet when bowel function resumes

  • Nasogastric tube feedings may be required in early postburn period.

  • ...

REFERENCES

1
Dries  DJ, Endorf  FW. Inhalation injury: epidemiology, pathology, treatment strategies. Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med.  2013;21:31. [View Abstract on OvidMe...

CODES

ICD10

  • T23.029A Burn of unspecified degree of unspecified single finger (nail) except thumb, initial encounter

  • T23.039A Burn of unspecified degree of unspecified multiple fingers (nail), not includ...

CLINICAL PEARLS

  • 1st degree: erythema of involved tissue; skin blanches with pressure. Skin may be tender.

  • 2nd degree: Skin is red and blistered. Skin is very tender.

  • 3rd degree: Burned skin is tough and...

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