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Influenza

Kai-Soon “David” Yang, MD and Bassem M. Mostafa Elsawy, MD, FAAFP, CMD Reviewed 06/2019
 


BASICS

DESCRIPTION

  • Acute, typically self-limited, febrile infection caused by orthomyxovirus influenza types A and B

  • Marked by inflammation of nasal mucosa, pharynx, conjunctiva, and respiratory tract

  • Ou...

DIAGNOSIS

Look for: 
  • Systemic symptoms

  • Cough

  • Not being able to cope with daily activities

  • Being confined to bed

HISTORY

Sudden onset of: 
  • Fever (37.7–40.0°C), especially within 3 days of illness onset

  • Anorexi...

TREATMENT

  • Symptomatic treatment (saline nasal spray, analgesic gargle, antipyretics, analgesics)

  • Cool-mist or ultrasonic humidifier to increase moisture of inspired air

  • Droplet precautions: See https://...

ONGOING CARE

FOLLOW-UP RECOMMENDATIONS

  • Mild cases: Usually, no follow-up is required.

  • Moderate or severe cases: Follow up until symptoms and any secondary sequelae resolve.

DIET

Increase fluid intake. 

PATIENT EDUCATION

REFERENCES

1
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Influenza antiviral medications: summary for clinicians. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/antivirals/summary-clinicians.htm. Accessed Novem...

ADDITIONAL READING

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Influenza (flu). https://www.cdc.gov/flu/index.htm. Accessed November 30, 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/index.htm. Accessed November 30, ...

CODES

ICD10

  • J11.1 Influenza due to unidentified influenza virus with other respiratory manifestations

  • J10.1 Flu due to oth ident influenza virus w oth resp manifest

  • J11.00 Flu due to unidentified flu vir...

CLINICAL PEARLS

  • Influenza is an acute, (typically) self-limited, febrile infection caused by influenza virus types A and B.

  • With rare exceptions, all persons >6 months should be vaccinated against i...

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