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Interstitial Nephritis

Roger P. Holland, MD, PhD Reviewed 06/2018
 


BASICS

DESCRIPTION

  • Acute and chronic tubulointerstitial diseases result from the interplay of renal cells and inflammatory cells and their products. Lethal or sublethal injury to renal cells leads to e...

DIAGNOSIS

  • AIN: suspected in a patient who presents with nonspecific signs and symptoms of AKI (e.g., malaise, fever, nausea, vomiting) with an elevated serum creatinine and an abnormal urinalysis

    • AKI...

TREATMENT

For AIN, data on corticosteroids’ efficacy have been limited (4)[B]. 

GENERAL MEASURES

  • Discontinue offending agent. If topical NSAIDs are in use, discontinue these as well.

  • Reduce exposure to o...

ONGOING CARE

FOLLOW UP RECOMMENDATIONS

Patient Monitoring

If patients must remain on nephrotoxic agents, measure renal function, electrolytes, and phosphorus frequently. 

DIET

  • Low potassium (<2 g/day)

  • L...

REFERENCES

1
Muriithi AK, Leung N, Valeri AM, et al. Clinical characteristics, causes and outcomes of acute interstitial nephritis in the elderly. Kidney Int.  2015;87(2):458–464. [View Abstract ...

ADDITIONAL READING

  • Braden GL, O’Shea MH, Mulhern JG. Tubulointerstitial diseases. Am J Kidney Dis.  2005;46(3):560–572. [View Abstract on OvidMedline]

  • Fouque D, Laville M. Low protein diets for c...

CODES

ICD10

  • N12 Tubulo-interstitial nephritis, not spcf as acute or chronic

  • N10 Acute tubulo-interstitial nephritis

  • N11.9 Chronic tubulo-interstitial nephritis, unspecified

  • N16 Renal tubulo-interstitial d...

CLINICAL PEARLS

  • First step in treatment is to remove OFA.

  • Most common OFA in elderly is PPIs and antibiotics.

  • A renal biopsy is preferred to confirm AIN.

  • Immunosuppressive therapy is employed if no subse...

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