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Listeriosis

Reviewed 06/2018
 


BASICS

DESCRIPTION

  • An infection caused by the ubiquitous, weakly hemolytic, gram-positive bacillus Listeria monocytogenes; pathogenic to many species

  • Occurs most often in fetuses (disseminated infantile...

DIAGNOSIS

HISTORY

  • Common symptoms: fever, watery diarrhea, nausea, headache, myalgias, joint aches

  • Severe headache, fever, stiff neck, seizures

  • Irritability, lethargy, poor feeding in neonates

  • Illness dur...

TREATMENT

MEDICATION

  • No definitive drug of choice or duration of therapy

  • Most healthy, nonpregnant individuals with suspected Listeria gastroenteritis require only supportive therapy (3)[A].

  • Antibiotic r...

ONGOING CARE

FOLLOW-UP RECOMMENDATIONS

Patient Monitoring

  • Vitals, temperature

  • Repeat lumbar puncture at 5 to 7 days in CNS-affected patients.

  • Repeat blood cultures if endocarditis.

  • Repeat imaging studies i...

REFERENCES

1
Dalton CB, Merritt TD, Unicomb LE, et al; for OzFoodNet Working Group. A national case-control study of risk factors for listeriosis in Australia. Epidemiol Infect.  2011;139(3):437–4...

ADDITIONAL READING

  • Bierhoff M, Krutwagen E, van Bommel EF, et al. Listeria peritonitis in patients on peritoneal dialysis: two cases and a review of the literature. Neth J Med.  2011;69(10):461–4...

CODES

ICD10

  • A32.9 Listeriosis, unspecified

  • P37.2 Neonatal (disseminated) listeriosis

  • A32.89 Other forms of listeriosis

  • A32.11 Listerial meningitis

  • A32.81 Oculoglandular listeriosis

  • A32.7 Listerial sepsis

  • A32...

CLINICAL PEARLS

  • Listeriosis is most common at the extremes of age.

  • In immunocompetent patients, 2 weeks of antibiotic therapy is sufficient for bacteremia. At least 3 weeks of therapy is required for C...

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