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Rectal Prolapse

Reviewed 06/2019
 


BASICS

Circumferential protrusion of the rectum beyond the anus 

DESCRIPTION

Several types 
  • Partial prolapse

    • Involves only mucosa

    • Frequently follows operative anal procedures (radial rectal folds prolaps...

DIAGNOSIS

HISTORY

Common historical elements 
  • Presence of palpable or visible rectal mass

  • Rectal pain, bleeding, or soiling

  • Prior anorectal surgery

  • Spinal cord injury or defect

  • Constipation and straining

    • F...

TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

  • For acute cases: Prompt manual reduction. If there are signs of bowel compromise (e.g., gangrene), emergency surgery is indicated.

  • Place patient in lithotomy position or knee-...

ONGOING CARE

Biofeedback improves postoperative function, especially in patients with pelvic floor dyssynergia. 

FOLLOW-UP RECOMMENDATIONS

Patient Monitoring

Monthly visits until possible need for surger...

REFERENCES

1
Melton GB, Kwaan MR. Rectal prolapse. Surg Clin North Am.  2013;93(1):187–198. [View Abstract on OvidMedline]
2
Tou S, Brown SR, Nelson RL. Surgery for complete (full-thickness) rectal ...

ADDITIONAL READING

  • Cadeddu F, Sileri P, Grande M, et al. Focus on abdominal rectopexy for full-thickness rectal prolapse: meta-analysis of literature. Tech Coloproctol.  2012;16(1):37–53. [View A...

SEE ALSO

Hemorrhoids; Intussusception 

CODES

ICD10

K62.3 Rectal prolapse 

ICD9

569.1 Rectal prolapse 

SNOMED

  • 57773001 Rectal prolapse (disorder)

  • 71663002 Incomplete rectal prolapse

  • 197213004 Complete rectal prolapse

CLINICAL PEARLS

  • Rectal prolapse most commonly involves females in their 5th decade.

  • In children, rectal prolapse is most common in children <3 years and typically resolves spontaneously.

  • High-fiber d...

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