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Roseola

Jeffrey D. Quinlan, MD, FAAFP Reviewed 06/2018
 


BASICS

Omnipresent infection occurring in infancy and childhood. Majority of cases are caused by human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6); may be associated with other diseases including encephalitis 

DESCRIPTION

  • Ac...

DIAGNOSIS

HISTORY

  • 3 to 5 days abrupt fever 102.2–104.0°F (39–40°C) not associated with a rash (1)

  • The child may be fussy during this prodrome (1,6).

  • Sudden drop of fever associated with appearance of ras...

TREATMENT

No treatment necessary, resolves without sequelae (1)[C

GENERAL MEASURES

  • Symptomatic relief including antipyretics (1)[C]

  • Hydration (1)[C]

MEDICATION

First Line

  • No specific first-line treatment ...

ONGOING CARE

FOLLOW UP RECOMMENDATIONS

Patient Monitoring

  • During febrile prodrome, monitor for dehydration.

  • None after typical rash appears and fever resolves

  • Mean duration of illness is 6 days (4).

  • If feb...

REFERENCES

1
Stone RC, Micali GA, Schwartz RA. Roseola infantum and its causal human herpesviruses. Int J Dermatol.  2014;53(4):397–403. [View Abstract on OvidMedline]
2
Wolz MM, Sciallis GF, Pitte...

ADDITIONAL READING

  • Ablashi DV, Devin CL, Yoshikawa T, et al. Review part 3: human herpesvirus-6 in multiple non-neurological diseases. J Med Virol.  2010;82(11):1903–1910. [View Abstract on Ovid...

CODES

ICD10

  • B08.20 Exanthema subitum [sixth disease], unspecified

  • B08.21 Exanthema subitum [sixth disease] due to human herpesvirus 6

  • B08.22 Exanthema subitum [sixth disease] due to human herpesvirus 7

  • B0...

CLINICAL PEARLS

  • Roseola infection should be suspected if an infant or young child presents with a high temperature without other clinical findings.

  • As the fever abates, a macular rash will be seen on t...

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