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Seizures, Febrile

Reviewed 06/2022
 


BASICS

DESCRIPTION

Febrile seizures (FS) occur in children aged 6 months to 5 years with fever ≥100.4°F (38°C) in the absence of an underlying neurologic abnormality, metabolic condition, or intracrani...

DIAGNOSIS

HISTORY

  • Symptoms of underlying infection or neurologic deficits

  • Onset, duration, type, and number of seizure  (4)

    • A SFS is generalized and associated with tonic-clonic movements of the limb and...

TREATMENT

Most FS are self-limited; however, if health care professionals are able to witness the FS, acute abortive treatment should be no different than any other seizure treatment. FSE rarely stops...

ONGOING CARE

FOLLOW-UP RECOMMENDATIONS

  • Anticonvulsant prophylaxis during subsequent febrile episodes is not recommended (5).

PATIENT EDUCATION

Guidance forparents should focus on reassurance, emphasizin...

REFERENCES

1
Smith DK, Sadler KP, Benedum M. Febrile seizures: risks, evaluation, and prognosis. Am Fam Physician. 2019;99(7):445-450.
2
Whelan H, Harmelink M, Chou E, et al. Complex febrile seizures—a s...

CODES

ICD10

  • R56.00 Simple febrile convulsions

  • R56.01 Complex febrile convulsions

  • G40.901 Epilepsy, unsp, not intractable, with status epilepticus

SNOMED

  • 432354000 Simple febrile seizure

  • 433083002 Complex fe...

CLINICAL PEARLS

  • FS are generally benign and without sequelae if the underlying causes are ruled out.

  • Labs, LP, neuroimaging, and EEG not routinely recommended in an acute setting in the absence of susp...

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