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Sporotrichosis

Garrett W. Huck, MD Reviewed 06/2018
 


BASICS

DESCRIPTION

  • Subacute or chronic fungal infection due to Sporothrix schenckii

  • Most frequent; least severe deep mycosis

  • Typically presents as pustules or papules that progress to form a subcutaneous...

DIAGNOSIS

HISTORY

  • History of typical exposure: minor cutaneous trauma handling plant material

  • Zoonotic transmission (animal to human) follows animal scratches or bites from cats, armadillos, rodents, ho...

TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

  • Local heat helps cutaneous/lymphocutaneous lesions. Apply 42–43°C daily for weeks, 72% cure rate (2)[B].

  • Keep cutaneous lesions clean.

  • Repeated drainage of infected joints

MEDICATION

ONGOING CARE

FOLLOW-UP RECOMMENDATIONS

Patient Monitoring

  • Check for compliance with long-term drug therapy (continue potassium iodide 1 to 2 months after lesions heal).

  • Monitor hepatic enzymes periodical...

REFERENCES

1
Barros MB, de Almeida Paes R, Schubach AO. Sporothrix schenckii and sporotrichosis. Clin Microbiol Rev.  2011;24(4):633–654. [View Abstract on OvidMedline]
2
Kauffman CA, Bustamante B, ...

ADDITIONAL READING

  • Aung AK, Teh BM, McGrath C, et al. Pulmonary sporotrichosis: case series and systematic analysis of literature on clinico-radiological patterns and management outcomes. Med Mycol. ...

CODES

ICD10

  • B42.9 Sporotrichosis, unspecified

  • B42.1 Lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis

  • B42.7 Disseminated sporotrichosis

  • B42.89 Other forms of sporotrichosis

  • B42.82 Sporotrichosis arthritis

  • B42.0 Pulmonary spor...

CLINICAL PEARLS

  • Consider cutaneous/lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis in individuals with a history of contact with soil who present with characteristic cutaneous lesions.

  • Disseminated sporotrichosis may d...

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