Skip to main content

Meckel Diverticulum, Emergency Medicine

Galeta C. Clayton Reviewed 06/2017
 


Basics

Description

  • Most common congenital abnormality of the GI tract

    • Results from incomplete obliteration of the omphalomesenteric duct

  • True diverticula (contains all layers):

    • 50% contain normal ileal mu...

Diagnosis

Signs and Symptoms

  • 3 different types of presentation:

    • Rectal bleeding due to hemorrhage, which results from mucosal ulcerations within the ectopic gastric tissue

    • Vomiting due to obstruction sec...

Treatment

Pre-Hospital

Establish IV access for patients with rectal bleeding or abdominal pain. 

Initial Stabilization/Therapy

  • Stabilization followed by early surgical evaluation

  • Hypotension:

    • Aggressive fl...

Follow-Up

Disposition

Admission Criteria

Presumptive diagnosis of Meckel diverticulum with diverticulitis, obstruction, intussusception, hemorrhage, or volvulus requires admission and surgical evaluatio...

Pearls and Pitfalls

  • Painless, brisk, bright-red blood per rectum in an infant is often caused by Meckel diverticulum.

  • Presents with a wide range of complications, including obstruction, intussusception...

Additional Reading

  • McCollough  M, Sharieff  GQ. Abdominal pain in children. Pediatr Clin North Am.  2006;53(1):107–137.

  • Park  JJ, Wolff  BG, Tollefson  MK, et al. Meckel diverticulum: The Mayo Cli...

Codes

ICD9

751.0 Meckel's diverticulum 

ICD10

Q43.0 Meckel's diverticulum (displaced) (hypertrophic) 

SNOMED

  • 37373007 Meckel's diverticulum (disorder)

  • 204687007 Displaced Meckel's diverticulum (disorder)

Subscribe to Access Full Content

Sign Up for a 10-Day Free Trial

Sign up for a 10-day FREE Trial now and receive full access to all content.

 
×