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Hyphema

Sajid Khan, MD and Maryam Arshad, MD Reviewed 06/2019
 


BASICS

DESCRIPTION

  • A grossly visible collection of blood in the anterior chamber of the eye

  • Microhyphema refers to red blood cells in the anterior chamber which do not layer out and are not grossly visi...

DIAGNOSIS

HISTORY

  • Eye pain and vision loss are the most common presenting complaints.

  • Photophobia and tearing may be present.

  • Nausea and vomiting are common.

  • Pediatric considerations: Investigate for pote...

TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

ALERT

If globe rupture is suspected, place an eye shield and consult ophthalmology immediately; no further examination or testing should be done.

 
  • Place the patient in a dark r...

ONGOING CARE

FOLLOW-UP RECOMMENDATIONS

In cases of traumatic hyphema, record intraocular pressure daily. 

PATIENT EDUCATION

  • Report sudden decrease in vision or increase in pain (suspicion for rebleeding ...

REFERENCES

1
Walton W, Von Hagen S, Grigorian R, et al. Management of traumatic hyphema. Surv Ophthalmol.  2002;47(4):297–334. [View Abstract on OvidMedline]
2
Arey ML, Mootha VV, Whittemore AR, et ...

ADDITIONAL READING

Gharaibeh A, Savage HI, Scherer RW, et al. Medical interventions for traumatic hyphema. Cochrane Database Syst Rev.  2013;(12):CD005431. [View Abstract on OvidMedline] 

CODES

ICD10

  • S05.10XA Contusion of eyeball and orbital tissues, unsp eye, init

  • H21.00 Hyphema, unspecified eye

ICD9

  • 921.3 Contusion of eyeball

  • 364.41 Hyphema of iris and ciliary body

SNOMED

  • 231954005 Traumati...

CLINICAL PEARLS

  • Hyphema is a collection of red blood cells in the anterior chamber that often results from trauma.

  • Once globe rupture has been excluded, a thorough examination for associated injuries a...

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